Dorset

With the leaves now in full fall and the days starting to get colder we are braced for winter – Hopefully a much shorter one this time around.

Mitch has gotten back into his refereeing and has had his first several games. He is not used to the distances to travel for most games as home club appointments were all within an hours drive. So far he has traveled as far as Ruislip and Oxford. Not far on the map, but up to 3 hours each way on public transport. This weekend he had a good opportunity with a game at one of the most prestigious boys schools in the UK, Sherborne in Dorset. So Tam came along for the ride. On the way we passed Stonehenge and a few other sights for the second time. We saw our first badger, unfortunately in a large lump on the side of the road. It would have caused quite a bit of damage to whatever had hit it. Sherborne seems to be famous for having more churches than houses, over a hundred in such a small place. A bit of a tourist Mecca and an amazing place to visit. Mitch had a good game with the home side winning 17-10, one of the best pitches he has ever been on too.

Sherborne Abbey
Sherborne Abbey

 

Another stained glass window
Another stained glass window

After a detour through Dorchester we arrived in Poole for our Airbnb accommodation with our host, who was out on a date with another lady from the brass band. We settled into some dog sitting with a couple of loud terriers who had been cooped up in the kitchen. Mitch also found out that someone can have Sky TV and not have the sports or movies channels (not telling you which channels he did have). After their date our host and his lady friend gave us a rundown of the local sites (tour guides themselves) and taught us the correct pronunciation of everything – including “Sherborne” (“sher-borne“). Poole itself at night was a bit of a fishing and wharf town. A few nice buildings and fully functional harbour. A few stag do’s and hens nights roamed the quiet pubs.

The next day was all about a visit to the Jurassic Coast of Dorset. A stop over at Corfe Castle ruins and a sneak around the gates got us a few snaps of a royal castle blown up by the parliamentarians in 1645, during the English Civil War. In the local village, built using most of the stone from the ruins, we found a troop of about 14 locals in hi-vis jackets trying to put up light decorations over the road, a bit of a laugh. Looks like we were too early for the party.

Corfe Castle from the moat
Corfe Castle from the moat
The Keep
The Keep
Tam making friends with ugly sheep
Tam making friends with ugly sheep
How many hi-vis people to string up a set of lights?
How many hi-vis people to string up a set of lights?

Moving on to Durdle Door, we found a massive ridge jutted out of the sea. The chalk banks behind had been eaten away by the ocean leaving an impressive geological formation. A group of guys were getting prepared for some insane team building exercise to swim through the arch with helmets and wetsuits.

Durdle Door
Durdle Door

 

A bit of rock climbing to the top (and some barrier jumping)
A bit of rock climbing to the top (and some barrier jumping)

 

The Jurassic Coast
The Jurassic Coast

 

Barmy, not balmy
Barmy, not balmy

 

Our free upgrade! Beats an economy car!
Our free upgrade! Beats an economy car!

Driving further west, we headed through narrow and hedge lined single-carriageways to Lyme Regis, a town famous for its fossils. That description could be extended to most of the holidaymakers we saw there too…The beach was covered pebbles much like Brighton, but if you looked long enough, you would be able to find small fossils eroded off the cliffs and washed up in the tide. In summers of the past, before the British hordes invaded the Spanish islands, this was one of the packed beaches, full of small rental changing rooms (to store your towel in when going for a swim), ice cream vendors and fish and chip shops.

Ben Ainslie's training ground
Ben Ainslie’s training ground

 

Lyme Regis. Even the street signs had fossil shapes,
Lyme Regis. Even the street signs had fossil shapes

 

Fush and Chups with salt and vinegar
Fush and Chups with salt and vinegar

 

Tam under attack after feeding the death birds
Tam under attack after feeding the death birds

 

Fossil hunting
Fossil hunting

With the weather starting to pack in, we sped back to London to our flat for Sunday roast. We are changing flats at the end of the month, moving to Fulham in a smaller 2 bedroom flat. A big change from the current flat of 11+3! Keen to experience more parts and places of London, but will definitely miss the Sunday dinners that the flat shared.

In terms of travel, Mitch has a few more busy weekends planned with refereeing out of town. We are also booking some winter holidays in Iceland, Bruges and Nuremberg, so expect a few more stories from those places!

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One thought on “Dorset

  1. Once again a big thank you for the latest. you certainly seem to be making the most of your O E, keep it up as i’m sure you will!!!! Your future travels too will be very interesting, look forward to those stories & photos. All is well here. Take care & carry on having fun & all that goes with it. Lots of Love Gran xx xx oo oo

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